Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Penguin of the Day

torpedo 
Torpedo by Derek Pettersson

Baby penguin nuzzles up to a tourist in Antarctica... then clambers all over him

  • Joel Oleson from California was on a private chartered tour to Antarctica
  • The 41-year-old was taken to a rocky beach by a guide to view penguins
  • He lay down to look as small and approachable as possible to the birds
  • Oleson captures moment on film as bird climbs on him and pecks his head
Penguins are usual wary creatures but when Joel Oleson visited a beach in Antarctica he made a surprising new furry friend. 
Oleson, 41 from California was on a private chartered tour to Antarctica when he caught on camera the intimate meeting between himself and a baby penguin.
The SharePoint expert for Microsoft was speaking at a series of technical conferences in Antarctica and South America when he had his unusual encounter. 




 
 
 Joel Oleson, 41 from California was on a private chartered tour to Antarctica when he met a new furry friend
 Joel Oleson, 41 from California was on a private chartered tour to Antarctica when he met a new furry friend
On one day during the tour a guide took him to a large penguin rookery with thousands of penguins along a rocky beach. Oleson says, 'Our guide explained that we should not approach the wildlife, but that if they approached us that was OK. 'He said, the smaller you appear to them, the less intimidating you'll be. So he said it was better to kneel or bend down. I thought if that was the case, then my best case would simply to be to lay down to make myself very small. 'As I lay there, the baby penguins became curious.'
Oleson is a SharePoint expert for Microsoft and was speaking at a series of technical conferences in area
Oleson is a SharePoint expert for Microsoft and was speaking at a series of technical conferences in area
The penguin clambers over his neck and appears completely unfazed as his wing rests over his face
The penguin clambers over his neck and appears completely unfazed as his wing rests over his face
In the footage - filmed by Oleson - a baby penguin approaches him and begins to peck at his head and face. The penguin clambers over his neck and appears completely unfazed as his wing rests over his face and he shifts about, gently nuzzling him, before sliding back onto the rocky beach  to continue pecking at his hat. Oleson says of the experience, 'As they approached me, I was thinking I need to be very still so I don't scare them. They were so cute with the way they walk with their little wings held back as they waddled.
Oleson says: 'As they approached me, I was thinking I need to be very still so I don't scare them'
Oleson says: 'As they approached me, I was thinking I need to be very still so I don't scare them'
While Oleson was surprised how friendly the little bird was it wasn't his first encounter with penguins
While Oleson was surprised how friendly the little bird was it wasn't his first encounter with penguins
'As one approached my head and started pecking around I wondering how sharp their beak was. At one point a baby penguin was pecking my forehead and face. I was filled with feelings of wonder and awe.'

The US technology expert said that the adult penguins kept their distance but the babies were more curious and he didn't notice any hostile or agitated behavior such as hissing or loud chattering.



While Oleson was surprised how friendly the little penguin was it wasn't his first encounter with the flightless breed of bird.  'I'm lucky in that I've spent time with penguins including Jackass penguins near Capetown in South Africa, and on Philip Island with fairy penguins in Australia, so this wasn't my first time spending time with wild penguins. The jackass penguins were very territorial and would nip at you and hiss if you got too close' 

You can read more about Olseon on his travel blog at travelingepic.com

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Injured penguin Bella swims towards Manly Wharf where her soulmate Lucky the Little Penguin has been waiting


Bella prepares to return to Lucky, mating partner who has been calling out for her at nig
Bella prepares to return to Lucky, mating partner who has been calling out for her at night. Picture: Toby Zerna
  • Bella the penguin was found with a wound caused by fishing line in November
  • She underwent surgery at ­Taronga Wildlife Hospital
  • Her soulmate Lucky has been waiting for her under Manly Wharf
  • Staff at Taronga Zoo call for harbour users to help keep the penguins safe
It’s probably not the first love story that has been set under the wharf in Manly, but the story of penguins Bella and Lucky is a beauty. Bella was found with a nasty foot wound caused by fishing line in November, in her usual haunt beneath Manly Wharf. She was taken to ­Taronga Wildlife Hospital, where she had surgery and stitches, and has spent the last month in recovery at the hospital’s intensive care unit and at Taronga’s rehabilitation pool.
The injury on Bella's foot is believed to have been caused by fishing line. Picture: Toby
The injury on Bella's foot is believed to have been caused by fishing line. Picture: Toby Zerna
 
With her foot now repaired, Bella was released at Store Beach in Manly by penguin warden Angelika Treichler, and the first things she did was look for her life mate Lucky. “I let her jump into the water and she dived down, then came up and looked around like she was getting her directions, then she swam off towards Manly Wharf,” Ms Treichler said.

Angelika Treichler holds Bella before releasing her at Store Beach. Picture: Toby Zerna
Angelika Treichler holds Bella before releasing her at Store Beach. Picture: Toby Zerna
 
“Lucky’s been sitting there just looking out every night waiting for her. He hasn’t even gone fishing.”

Bella swims off with confidence. Picture: Toby Zerna
Bella swims off with confidence. Picture: Toby Zerna

Ms Treichler, who with a seabird expert spent two days catching Bella after she was injured, said the feeling of letting her go was incredible. “It was as though I was being released into freedom myself,” she said. The staff from Taronga Zoo gave the penguins some privacy to reunite, but wanted to emphasise that injuries like Bella’s could be avoided.

Bella prepares to return to Lucky, mating partner who has been calling out for her at nig
Injuries like Bella’s could be avoided. Picture: Toby Zerna

Libby Hall, who manages the Taronga hospital said that Bella couldn’t walk or swim when she arrived injured and was also underweight. She said that more awareness around rubbish disposal could have prevented her wounds, which were “consistent with fishing line injuries”. Sydney Harbour National Park ranger Melanie Tyas called on harbour users to keep the penguins in mind over summer.

Bella (front) with her penguin friend Monty at Taronga Zoo. Picture: Toby Zerna
Bella (front) with her penguin friend Monty at Taronga Zoo. Picture: Toby Zerna
 
“The breeding success of the population over the last five years is testament to how much Sydneysiders care about these beautiful birds,” she said. “The Harbour is busier than usual over Christmas and summer and the penguins are at their most vulnerable as many of them are moulting. We’re asking everyone to remember our little penguins are about and to help look after what really is a unique population in our city.”

source 

Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Penguins of the Day

Blizzard 


Juvenile King Penguin 

Juvenile King Penguin by Peter Orr

New baby penguin makes its debut at Pittsburgh's National Aviary


The first of two African penguin chicks hatched at the National Aviary on the North Side early Monday. The new chick can't be seen in the photo, but Aviary officials said its parents will huddle over the chick to provide warmth, likely concealing it for a time from the camera.



By Megan Harris
Monday, Dec. 15, 2014

Viewers caught an affectionate scene Monday as the first of two African penguin chicks hatched on camera at the National Aviary on the North Side. The newly installed high-resolution camera, hosted live at triblive.com/babypenguins , has logged more than 35,000 views since its installation last week.
The chick is about the size of a golf ball and covered in gray, downy feathers, aviary spokeswoman Robin Weber said. Specialists will wait for the second chick to hatch before they step in and grab the pair for a more thorough examination. “Confirmation of a birth, for us, just means we stick our head inside and make sure it's there,” Weber said. “Our online viewers actually noticed the increased activity first. No one at the aviary has actually seen the chick on camera yet.”
Parents Sidney and Bette can be seen, at times, nuzzling the nest area with their beaks to reposition the chick or remaining egg, she said. When a chick is hatched, it has the yolk sack attached to provide nutrition, but it should absorb within a few days. Soon, the chicks will start begging for food, Weber said, and the parents will feed it a diet of partially digested fish multiple times a day.
They will be named through auction or in honor of someone once DNA tests reveal their gender weeks from now, Weber said. The chicks are the third set for Sidney and Bette. If all goes well, the chicks would remain in the nest for the first three to four weeks, then be moved inside to be hand-reared by the aviary staff.

source 

Sunday, December 14, 2014

San Diego SeaWorld releases photos of first test-tube penguin

(Now if we can just get them to release the orcas!) 
By Marcus Hondro   
 
 
The first photos of the first test-tube penguin, born from an artificial insemination method never before used with penguins, have been released by SeaWorld San Diego. The baby, not yet named but 12 weeks old, looks pretty much like any other penguin.

Penguin birthed from thawed sperm
 
Why birth a Magellanic penguin from artificial insemination? Apparently it's all about education and learning about how penguins reproduce. That's the word from SeaWorld San Diego on why the penguin to date known only as '184' was brought into existence using frozen-then-thawed sperm. “The goal of our research center is to study a species’ reproductive biology," the head of SeaWorld's reproductive center, Dr. Justine O’Brian, said. "To learn as much as we can about that and use this to not only monitor the health of not only our zoological populations but wild populations as well."

Penguin 184 mixes into population There appear to be no health issues with 184, a female. NBC San Diego News 7 reported she began life being fed a mixture of "ground herring fillets, krill, vitamins, minerals and water" by biologists but has now moved on to eating fish on her own.

She's also doing what the natural-born penguins are doing: hanging out with other baby penguins. There is, SeaWorld said, no difference to note between the penguin created from artificial insemination and all of the Penguins at SeaWorld created from a Mom and Dad penguin having sex. Dr. O'Brian said the frozen-then-thawed method of bringing penguin 184 to life is "a technique that has never been performed successfully in any penguin species."

 Now if only they would get on with naming 184. Testy? Freezey?

source

Scottish Flashback: Edinburgh Zoo penguins, 1978

The offer of mince pies and Christmas pudding is rebuffed by the penguins. Picture: TSPL
The offer of mince pies and Christmas pudding is rebuffed by the penguins. Picture: TSPL
IN OUR first of 12 ‘Christmas’ Flashbacks, we’re at Edinburgh Zoo in 1978.

Father Christmas had time on his way to Jenners department store in Princes Street to stop off at the Zoo and see if any of the resident penguins would care for some mince pies or some Christmas pudding.
However, Santa was met with a frosty reception from the birds, who declined his offer.
There have been penguins at Edinburgh Zoo since the Christian Salvesen whaling expedition brought back three king penguins in January 1914.
The first chick hatched in 1919 - the first penguin to be hatched in captivity.
These were the first penguins to be seen outside of the South Atlantic anywhere in the world.

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Penguin of the Day

Gentoo penguin dash\

Gentoo penguin dash by Peter Orr,

This Week's Pencognito!






Please visit Jen and all the Pengies by clicking this link!

Saturday, December 13, 2014

Penguins of the Day (Catch-up Post)

kingsun1 

kingsun1 by Derek Pettersson


A penguin. In Africa. 

A Penguin. In Africa. by adam dobson


Foods that way 

Foods that way by Derek Pettersson

Camera set to capture birth of penguins in Pittsburgh

Dec 12, 2014
PITTSBURGH —A high-resolution, infrared camera is set up, ready to capture the pending births of two penguins at the National Aviary on the North Side.

 Sidney The Penguin

Sidney The Penguin
 
 PITTSBURGH —A high-resolution, infrared camera is set up, ready to capture the pending births of two penguins at the National Aviary on the North Side.
 The aviary said that the eggs were laid about a month ago, and they are expected to hatch sometime next week in a nesting cave at the Penguin Point exhibit.

Live video from the penguin cam is streaming now at penguinnestcam.org.
The parents, Sidney and Bette, had two other sets of chicks at the zoo in 2012 and last year.
Sidney was named after another Pittsburgh penguin -- hockey star Sidney Crosby.

The Penguin Point exhibit encompasses 17 African penguins. There are fewer than 20,000 of them currently living in the wild.

source 
 

Timaru Editorial: Are we overlooking penguin opportunity?

Stuff.co.nz Stuff.co.nzEditorial

Last updated 12/12/2014
 
OPINION: I'm swimming against the tide here, but I'd be interested to know what you think.
On Monday we had a story that the number of penguins nesting around the Timaru coastline had almost doubled in the last year, from 53 to 90.

Also included were comments from a German couple for whom watching the penguins come ashore on Caroline Bay was the highlight of their year-long New Zealand trip.

They'd found out about the penguins by chance from other tourists in Queenstown, but then had trouble finding any promotional material on them.

The volunteer group that watches over the penguins though did not see this as a problem, its main aim being to protect the birds. It had put out some fliers around town and was looking at promotion in local motels, but not out of town.

Okay, fair enough. This isn't really the job of a volunteer group which was formed out of concern for the penguins' welfare.

So what does the mayor think? What does the council's tourism arm think?

Damon Odey and Aoraki Development Business and Tourism's (ADBT) tourism manager Katerina Tiscenko are all for protecting and monitoring the penguins, but not using them as a tourist attraction.
Also supporting this stand, they say, is the Department of Conservation, an eco-tourism operator and an environmentalist.

But, and this is where the swimming against the tide comes in, surely this is an opportunity for Timaru. We're a lovely seaside town, but don't have many points of difference to attract tourists. The wider region does, but Timaru doesn't.

There's the Caroline Bay Carnival and the Te Ana Maori Rock Art Centre, but there's not a lot else we've got for tourists that other rural New Zealand towns don't have.

Oamaru has made the most of its penguins. It has built viewing grandstands and a visitors' centre with shop. There are tours, a booking website, an adopt-a-penguin programme. The facility attracts 100,000 people a year at $5 a child and $10 an adult. That's good money.

We are now exactly where Oamaru was 21 years ago.

For sure, the welfare of the penguins is paramount, but the more people looking at them, the more a business is built around them, the safer they could be.

Penguins used to regularly get run over in Oamaru before the viewing areas were installed.
And there is a market out there, as the German couple showed.

But this is just what I think, and I'm no expert. Is this even worth talking about? Drop me a line, let me know.

source